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Whatever your code of Football is,  let us take you & pick you up from the Football.

You will get from A to B in comfort and style.

Cheaper & cleaner than a taxi and  no surprise surges like an Uber. 
Safe, reliable and on time every time! 
Short local taxi style trips or long haul trips. 
Baby/booster seats also available. 

Cash or card payments available. 
Call or message anytime for a quote!

Transport

Getting to most matches is quite easy in Melbourne because most matches are played within a 5 kilometer radius of the Melbourne CBD where there is plenty of public transport.

If you decide to watch your team when they play interstate and are flying to or from such games we recommend Melbourne Star Limousine and Taxi Services 1300 22 1018 (www.melbournestarlimos.com.au )

or

PERSONALIZED CABS 1300 13 9740 (www.personalizedcabs.com.au .

Both these companies are highly regarded and provide excellent service when pre booked.

We also have free Child Seats if pre ordered

Football

There are various types of ‘’football’’ played in Victoria. There is one NRL team, two soccer teams and 10 AFL teams based in Victoria alone.

The best known teams have the word “Melbourne”” in them. You see, Melbourne is one of the world’s most liveable cities because it is magnificent one day and marvellous the next.

So we have:

AFL – the MELBOURNE DEMONS

The Melbourne Football Club, nicknamed the Demons, is a professional Australian rules football club, playing in the Australian Football League (AFL). It is named after and based in the city of Melbourne, Victoria, and plays its home games at the Melbourne Cricket Ground (MCG).

Melbourne is the world’s oldest professional club of any football code. The club’s origins can be traced to an 1858 letter in which Tom Wills, captain of the Victoria cricket team, calls for the formation of a “foot-ball club” with its own “code of laws”. An informal Melbourne team played that winter and was officially formed in May 1859 when Wills and three other members codified “The Rules of the Melbourne Football Club”—the basis of Australian Rules football. The club was a dominant force in the earliest Australian Rules football competition, the Challenge Cup, and was also a foundation member of the Victorian Football Association (VFA) in 1877 and the Victorian Football League (VFL) in 1896, which later became the national Australian Football League. Melbourne has won 12 VFL/AFL premierships, the latest in 1964.

The club celebrated its 150th anniversary in 2008 by naming “150 Heroes” as well as creating a birthday logo which appeared on its official guernsey.

NRL – the MELBOURNE STORM

The Melbourne Storm is a rugby league team based in Melbourne, Victoria in Australia that participates in the National Rugby League. The first fully professional rugby league team based in the state, the Storm entered the competition in 1998. The club play their home games at AAMI Park. The Storm has won three premierships since their inception, in 1999, 2012 and 2017.

SOCCER – MELBOURNE CITY and MELBOURNE VICTORY

Melbourne City Football Club is an Australian professional soccer club based in the northern Melbourne suburb of Bundoora, Victoria. It competes in the country’s premier competition, the A-League, under licence from Football Federation Australia.

Founded in 2009 as Melbourne Heart, the club competed under that name from its inaugural 2010–11 season until it was acquired and subsequently rebranded in mid-2014 by the City Football Group, in partnership with Holding M.S. Australia. In August 2015, City Football Group bought out the Holding M.S. Australia consortium to acquire 100% ownership of the club.

The club is run from the City Football Academy, a facility based at Melbourne’s La Trobe University. The club plays home matches at Melbourne Rectangular Stadium, commercially known as AAMI Park, a 30,050 seat multi-use venue in Melbourne’s City Centre.

Melbourne Victory Football Club is an Australian professional soccer club based in city centre of Melbourne, Victoria. Competing in the country’s premier competition, the A-League, under licence from Football Federation Australia, Victory entered the competition in the inaugural season as the only Victorian-based club in the newly revamped domestic Australian league.

Recognised as the most supported and currently the most successful club in the league to date, Victory has won four A-League Championships, three A-League Premierships, one Pre-Season Challenge Cup and one FFA Cup, the only club to have won all four domestic trophies in the modern era of Australian soccer. 

Although Victory is supported across the whole Melbourne metropolitan area, as well as regional cities in the state, it is based primarily in the city centre. The club’s home ground is the Melbourne Rectangular Stadium, playing a majority of home matches at the venue, with the larger Docklands Stadium utilised for matches such as derbies and finals. As well as this, the club has an agreement to play a single match at Kardinia Park in Geelong every season.

RUGBY UNION – the MELBOURNE REBELS

The Melbourne Rebels (formerly known as the Rabo Direct Melbourne Rebels for sponsorship reasons) are a professional rugby union team based in Melbourne. They made their debut in SANZAR’s Super Rugby tournament in 2011. They were the first privately owned professional rugby union team in Australia, until 2017 when shares in the franchise were returned to the Victorian Rugby Union. The club shares its name with a former Australian Rugby Championship team, but is unrelated.

An explanation of ‘’football’’.

While calling the world’s most popular sport “soccer” is typically depicted as a symbol of ignorance, the reason Americans and Australians don’t call it “football” like the rest of the world is actually Britain’s fault.

The word “soccer” is a British invention that British people only stopped using about 30 years ago, according to a new paper by University of Michigan professor Stefan Szymanski.

The word “soccer” comes from the use of the term “association football” in Britain, and it goes back 200 years.

In the early-1800s a bunch of British universities took “football” — a medieval game — and started playing their own versions of it, all under different rules. To standardized things across the country, these games were categorized under different organisations with different names.

One variant of the game you played with your hands became “rugby football.” Another variant came to be known as “association football” after the Football Association formed to promote the game in 1863, 15 years after the rules were made at Cambridge.

“Rugby football” became “ruggle” for short. “Association football” became “soccer.”

After these two sports spread across the Atlantic, Americans and Australians invented their own variant of the game that they simply called “football” in the early 1900s.

“Association football” became “soccer” in America, and what was called “gridiron” in Britain (and Australia) became simply “football” in America.

“Football” in Australia generally refers to Australian Rules football.

The interesting thing here is that Brits still used “soccer” regularly for a huge chunk of the 20th century.

Between 1960 and 1980, “soccer” and “football” were “almost interchangeable” in Britain, Szymanski found.

Then everything changed (via Szymanski):

“Since 1980 the usage of the word ‘soccer’ has declined in British publications, and where it is used, it usually refers to an American context. This decline seems to be a reaction against the increased usage in the US which seems to be associated with the highpoint of the NASL around 1980.”

British people stopped saying “soccer” because of its American connotations.

So no, it’s not wrong to call it “soccer” if you’re American. Or Australian.